The Curious Case of Çatalhöyük

The curious case of Çatalhöyük

An amazing new exhibit about the Catalhoyuk Research Project in Istanbul continues until the 25th October. Further information can be found here: https://anamed.ku.edu.tr/en/curious-case-catalhoyuk

Part of the exhibit will be the upcoming performance "BİR/ONE" by Nazlı Gürlek on 23rd September: https://www.facebook.com/events/144654516140412/

Review: Consciousness and Creativity at the Dawn of Settled Life

A review of the Cambridge conference on 'Consciousness and Creativity at the Dawn of Settled Life' by Nazlı Gürlek to appear in Aktuel Arkeoloji:

Consciousness is a hot topic today yet a great mystery for most. Biologists and neuroscientists pair up with psychologists and philosophers to understand how the brain functions and how a physical brain creates our experience of the world. Given the complexity of the argument, trying to understand the Neolithic mind looking at the archeological evidences of material culture with the help of cognitive scientists may sound like a crazy prospect, yet a truly interesting one...

Creating a new and improved visual presence at Çatalhöyük

Article by Jenna Tinning

The 2015 Visualisation Team, responsible for the redesign of Çatalhöyük’s web presence: (From left to right) Katrina Gargett, Jenna Tinning, Laia Pujol, Andrew Henderson and Sara Perry.
The 2015 Visualisation Team, responsible for the redesign of Çatalhöyük’s web presence: (From left to right) Katrina Gargett, Jenna Tinning, Laia Pujol, Andrew Henderson and Sara Perry.

The primary goal of the Visualisation Team during the 2015 field season at Çatalhöyük was to collect all of the content necessary to redo the entire web presence of the site – including all of the site’s social media. There were a number of important implications we had to consider when attempting a project like this. In a medium such as the internet where the visual aspects are so highly prioritised, the impression that the website gives is crucial. Every piece of content we wrote, and every image we selected, had to go through numerous rounds of critique. This was to ensure that the content was truly reflective of different stakeholders’ interests, as well as critically engaged with the values of the project.

Baskets made of clay?

By Andrew Henderson

A pot found in trench 1 of the West Mound at Ҫatalhӧyük which has basket-like features.
A pot found in trench 1 of the West Mound at Ҫatalhӧyük which has basket-like features.

Although technologies evolve and change, fundamentally their core function and designs often remain the same. It has long been thought that pottery styles and shapes were influenced by earlier organic containers such as baskets. It is often argued that the shape and decorative patterns on pottery from the American southwest, for example, mimic the designs of earlier basketry. Within this context, the ongoing work of Ҫatalhöyük’s ceramic specialist Ingmar Franz suggests that these influences may also be present in the pottery found at the West Mound.

main sponsors

Yapı Kredi

Koçtaş

Boeing

secondary sponsors

Konya Şeker

Shell